Untold Stories Of World History 03

Abdullah Hakim Quick

Channel: Abdullah Hakim Quick

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Topics: History

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© No part of this transcript may be copied or referenced or transmitted in any way whatsoever. Transcripts are auto-generated and thus will be be inaccurate. We are working on a system to allow volunteers to edit transcripts in a controlled system.


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La Jolla.

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Bismillah R Rahman r Rahim In the Name of Allah, the magnificent and merciful. We praise Allah, Creator of the heavens and the earth. And we send peace and blessings to all of the prophets, and especially to our beloved Prophet Muhammad, his family, his companions, and all those who call to his way to the Day of Judgment. And we begin with the greeting words of peace. Assalamu alaykum warahmatullahi wabarakatuh, the Prophet Muhammad peace and blessings be upon him, sent his followers to the four corners of the earth. And over the centuries, there were high points for Muslims. And they were also low points. Muslims were kings, and slaves, and in all different aspects of life, in

00:01:38--> 00:02:30

in different levels of testing. Muslims who practice their faith, were able to come to the surface, you know, as followers of the greatest prophet, whoever lived. It is reported in the European slavery that went across from the Atlantic, that as many as 30% of the slaves who came from Africa into the Americas were taken as political prisoners to the Western Hemisphere, were Muslims, many of these people are still revisiting their roots. And this is making Islam the fastest growing religion in the West. This is a very important topic, we need to go deep into what actually happened to the slaves to try to understand this phenomenon, because it is still influencing American society today,

00:02:31--> 00:03:22

it still has a powerful impact upon the shaping of the minds of the younger generation, and upon what is happening in the Western countries. Originally, when slavery was practiced in America, and in this Western Hemisphere, the first slaves were actually the poor whites. But because they could identify with the Masters with the the upper class, they refuse to stay within a state of slavery. Slavery was then changed to the red Indians, to the native people of America. But the native people were living on their land. And so they refused also, to remain in slavery. And either they would sit down and refuse to move until they died. Or they would fight to their death. And they would escape.

00:03:23--> 00:03:58

So the European colonialists at that time needed to have people who could easily be identified. And also were familiar with the the growing of cotton, and sugarcane, and living within a semi tropical climate. And so they look to the west coast of Africa, to try to bring in slaves who would fit this role, and who would propel the culture to give products for the industrial revolution that was about to happen.

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The first slaves were brought into the New World, around 1580. And this was through the Portuguese, and the Spanish, who gave out licenses in 1518. And then we find slaves coming in.

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After that point, we find them the Dutch, the British, the French, all of the colonial masters at the time, was selling people as you sell our channel. And this slavery continued and increased until the point where millions of people were affected by it. And so we can say that through the slave trade, and through what happened in what is called the Middle Passage in between Africa and the Americas, that millions of people actually met death and destruction and Africa up until today has an

00:05:00--> 00:06:02

not recovered from this terrible genocide that went on. All tribes, all languages, all religions in West Africa, were brought together and put onto the slave boats. I Shanti, Cora Monti, Yoruba Ebo, Wolof, amongst them were Muslims. Almost one in every three of the slaves being taken to America was Muslim, the mandinka the Fulani, the hausa. And from the Yoruba and Ashanti, those who had accepted Islam, also finally found themselves on the boat. In early America, it was also reported that some of the African people who were living in America had slaves that they own their own property. But in 1685, the code noir Noir, the black laws were written. And in this, this divisive legislation that

00:06:02--> 00:06:21

was passed, every person of African descent became a slave. And so, with no hope, for freedom, resistance became a powerful message amongst the African slaves. And we find that

00:06:22--> 00:07:18

many of the different nations especially the Muslims, were leading the forces against the slave masters and the colonial regimes and reports are coming especially of men, dingoes, which is the English way of saying men Dinka from the mandate people. And we know that this is one of the largest language groups and cultural groups in West Africa. And they became the leaders of the resistance in many parts of the Caribbean and in South America. So we find, as some examples, in 1833, a female plantation owner, Gertrude Carmichael, she was living in St. Vincent and Trinidad in the Caribbean. She writes within her writings, and these are available today, that many Negro nations are not

00:07:18--> 00:08:14

idolatrous, but they are mahoma 10s. So she used this word Muhammad, which is a crusading word, a middle age, terminology used for Muslims, by Ron Edwards, and his famous history of the West Indies. In 1794. He speaks about an old faithful Mandingo servant, and when he describes him, he said, he never forgot his morning or evening prayer. And he used to chant in a very shrill voice, La ilaha illa Allah, there is no God, but Allah, Robert Madden, a British magistrate who went to Jamaica, during the time when slavery was being abolished, he discovered a society of Muslims living in Jamaica, and Robert Madden had traveled in Turkey, and in some of the Islamic lands, so he learned

00:08:14--> 00:09:04

to speak some Arabic, he knew how to greet Muslims, and to open up a conversation in the Arabic language. So it is reported that he gathered together a group of the slaves who were about to be put into a higher level of life and to be manumitted from slavery. And he recognized something different about them, he could see that they were probably Muslims. So he greeted them in Arabic, and he said, they would have recited the whole of the court and if I did not tell them to be quiet, he also uncovered amongst them a watseka he uncovered a document that was written in the Arabic language. And this was a key part of this document became a very important piece, because what the document is

00:09:04--> 00:09:18

speaking about, it is calling for jihad. And it becomes the basis of a great slave rebellion that happened in the years 1821 to 1822.

00:09:19--> 00:09:23

Following this, we find that

00:09:24--> 00:09:59

these mandinka people are living throughout the Caribbean region. in Trinidad, the island of Trinidad, which is off the coast of South America. The Mandingo society is developed by the slaves. And this society is developed in order to free slaves to take them out of bondage and to buy them and to then allow them to live a free life. Also on the island of Cuba, there was a sizable population of Muslims again, Mandingo is a term

00:10:00--> 00:10:10

Which has been used for all of the Muslims in Haiti, which is the French colony, known to be the first major revolution in the Western Hemisphere.

00:10:12--> 00:11:09

between 1753 and 1757, one of the leaders of the great Haitian uprising was Makka dal and meccan. Del was a Muslim Imam. He was a leader. He was a learned person. And he was part of the great revolution of Tucson, Lovato. That happened in Haiti, in Suriname, which was the most dangerous colony of the Dutch in that region and Suriname is what they call today also Dutch Guyana. So it falls in South America, the great revolt against the Dutch slave masters was being led by a general called adorabile. And his Lieutenant was called Zamzam, like Zamzam water that we drink in Mecca to makalah. So we find Arabic names being used by people throughout the region. In the Bahamas, who are

00:11:09--> 00:12:03

so famous today for the beautiful beaches, you find on the island of exuma. You find writings that show a large population of people. And the writings show that these were followers of Muhammad. Now we know that this is a middle aged, crusading term that is being used to describe Muslims. So what they were actually saying is that on the island of exuma, this large portion of the population were Muslims living in the Bahamas. And so documentation like this is coming to the surface, all over the Caribbean region. It is found in South America, in Central America, that shows a strong presence of Muslims within this region. And that not only were they part of the societies, but they were the

00:12:03--> 00:12:11

leaders in resistance. Islam gave them a strong identity. And so they resisted culturally,

00:12:12--> 00:12:39

they resisted, religiously. And it is reported that part of the system to break the slaves was not to allow them to practice their religions. And especially if the slave masters found somebody who prayed, or who fasted in the month of Ramadan, that person would be tortured to death in front of the other slaves. If they found somebody who would not eat pork, or somebody who would

00:12:40--> 00:13:35

refuse to be naked all the time, they would also torture that person. They broke up the families, they made the people change their language, they changed the names of the people from the original African names, or from the names of Islamic origin. Especially if the name was an Arabic, they made the people change their name. And by this, they were able to water down the culture and to dissolve Islam into a large slave population. But the the the seeds of resistance remained in the people. And it is through these seeds that we are seeing people on these islands and these regions accepting Islam in the 21st century. Let us return after a few moments and look about an example of one of the

00:13:35--> 00:13:39

greatest slave revolts in the Western Hemisphere.

00:14:23--> 00:14:41

It is reported by historians that the slavery period in America was one of the most brutal periods in the history of this planet. Millions of people died on the shores of Africa, in the Middle Passage, and in the Americas,

00:14:42--> 00:14:59

in the brutal serfdom, the brutal ball and chain slavery that we find all throughout this region. And because of this brutality, and because of the lack of hope, people naturally resist and stories of resistance are

00:15:00--> 00:15:21

Written in histories in oral cultures, and we find that African slaves resisted right from the shores of Africa, when they knew that they were being taken away from their families, that they resist it, and they would jump off the boats, they would struggle with everything that they had. Also, we find that

00:15:22--> 00:16:17

in the Middle Passage itself, we find that boats were taken over by the slaves and the Amistad. Both of them that the famous well documented boat has come into popular literature and understanding. And this Amistad is an example of resistance of the slaves. And so, this struggle continued right into the Americas. Muslims resisted in Jamaica, in Trinidad, in St. Vincent, in all regions within the Caribbean Basin, and Central America, in the United States. There were different forms of slave revolts. There was in America, not turnout Denmark vz, there were so many different ways to resist. It is reported, also a woman Harriet Tubman, developed the Underground Railroad, where she enabled

00:16:17--> 00:16:29

Muslims or African people to flee from the south, into Canada. And so this became one of the greatest African resistance in the West.

00:16:30--> 00:17:12

What concerns us here is to bring out an aspect of this resistance that in the past has been overlooked, and that is the presence of Muslims. It is now recognized that over 30% of the slaves brought to the Americans were Muslims. Now, we are seeing documentation coming to the surface. We are seeing that Muslims maintained their culture of writing Arabic, that they maintain the ability to express the core and to express their Islamic culture, even though they were in a state of slavery. One of the most well documented

00:17:13--> 00:17:18

resistances that happened in the West was the case of Brazil.

00:17:19--> 00:17:23

Brazil, was a Portuguese Portuguese colony

00:17:24--> 00:17:32

that was developed in the early part of the slavery period. And it was known for its high production in sugarcane.

00:17:33--> 00:18:03

From 1540 to 1570. The Indians, the native people of Brazil were used in order to deal with the sugarcane. But they couldn't handle the pressure. And this was their original land. So they refuse to submit, and either would die on the plantation, or they would escape. And so Africans were brought from the southern Gambia region, from Benin, coming down from Nigeria, and that part of West Africa and also from Angola.

00:18:04--> 00:18:13

From the southern Gambia region, there came the wall off the mandinka, who had very strong traditions within Islam, where you had

00:18:14--> 00:18:31

great Mujahideen great strugglers in West Africa. Also from Benin, they will house the slaves. They were Ashanti and they were Yoruba. And a sizable number of the Brazilian slaves also were in a state of Islam.

00:18:32--> 00:19:24

They were described by the Portuguese, as exceedingly spirited, and resolute. They will also described as the most intelligent element amongst the important Africans, because many of them could read and write the Arabic language. So amongst the slaves that came to Brazil, and this is a special phenomena that happened in Brazil. And we don't find it like this anywhere else in the Americas. There were a number of Imams and teachers called Muslims amongst the slaves. And so they were able to unite the tribes, and they were able to actually concentrate themselves into Islamic communities. The main section of the Muslim population in Brazil, was a province called Bahia. And in the Bahia

00:19:24--> 00:19:25

section,

00:19:26--> 00:19:37

the Muslims were well known for their personalities, and the way that they conducted themselves. It is said that the Muslims would get up early in the morning.

00:19:38--> 00:19:58

They would go to bed early. They live the quiet life. They were very reserved in their conversations. They lower their gaze, restrain the glances. They did not lie. They did not drink alcohol. They practice polygamy. They had more than one wife

00:19:59--> 00:20:00

but one

00:20:00--> 00:20:23

interesting aspect about the the Muslims there and it shows the strength of the Imams, they did not allow the men to beat their wives. And so from that a culture develops, a culture of justice develops. And the the the women within the Islamic community of Brazil, were powerful also, and involved in the struggle.

00:20:25--> 00:21:09

The Imams, and the Muslims, the teachers were able to carry out the different Islamic rituals, they carried on the ceremonies of birth of marriage of janaza. They developed an independent system of thinking, and from this independent thinking, a type of collective leadership developed. And this leadership had the concept of Amir, where the masses of the Muslims related to the leader, and we're prepared to do anything if it was commanded by the leader, In the name of Allah subhanho wa Taala. And so in May 27 1807,

00:21:10--> 00:21:29

the first revolt took place in Bahia. It was a powerful revolt. And the intention of this revolt was to kill the Masters poisoned the water system, and to return to Africa. But unfortunately,

00:21:30--> 00:21:37

spice week weak minded hypocrites will now 15 in the ranks of the Muslims

00:21:38--> 00:22:27

gave the information over to the authorities. And the government then waited for the revolt. And just before it was about to take place, they, they suppressed it, and they killed the leaders. But they took some of the people who were involved in it, and they put them on boats, and they sent them back to Africa. The second major revolt was in 1814, between 1814 to 1860. This was a spontaneous revolt. It was not organized in the way of the first revolt. And because of this lack of organization, and the spontaneous nature of the revolt, they were able to kill many of the masters, and they were able to capture certain sections of the land. But they were eventually put down, and

00:22:27--> 00:23:25

many of their rig leaders were either killed or sent back to Africa. The largest revolt took place in 1835. And this is known as the Great revolt of the Malays. What is important to understand is that this revolt was led by Muslim scholars. And there were 10 Muslim scholars in particular, who gathered together and who wrote different documents, they would send the watseka to the other people and you can see a document here, which is actually from Brazilian Muslims, written in the Arabic language. And so the leaders of these revolts came from different parts of West Africa. The well known Chef dandara was a hausa Muslim share Sunny, was a Europa Muslim, Muslim, Abu Bakar. ahuna was

00:23:25--> 00:24:19

also a euro bond. He was the most well known person of the revolt, and also Melhem Bilaal. He was also Yoruba, and a well known person within the revolt. What happens now in this concentration, that we find a powerful force coming out of the Muslims, they literally had developed masjids there were 20 known masjids in Salvador, which is like the capital of Bahia. And they gather together within the masjids. And they are established special meeting places like de Juan's, or special places where they would gather together in order to discuss the revolt. And so through these secret meetings, and their connection with their Amir, and by communicating in the Arabic language, and taking a special

00:24:19--> 00:24:59

oath from the people, they were able to spread the word of a large revolt far and wide, and it was not detected by the authorities. They chose Ramadan as the date of the revolt, and but unfortunately, again, munaf 18 came into the picture, and they informed the government authorities about this upcoming major revolt of the malaise that was to take place. Even so a strong fight continued, and the Muslims were able to take the struggle all throughout the countryside. They were able to conquer certainly

00:25:00--> 00:25:48

sections within Salvador. But because of the technology, the weapons and the organization of the Portuguese army, the revolt was actually eventually put down. And a mass deportation happened were many of the leaders and many of the people involved in the in the revolt, instead of just being killed. They were put on boats, and they were sent back to West Africa. And that is interesting today, that in Lagos in Nigeria, you can pray in a Brazilian Masjid. So you can make your salaat in a mosque that was built by Brazilian Muslims, who were captured struggle for the independence and eventually returned to West Africa. And they built masjids within a major West African city.

00:25:49--> 00:26:43

What this revolt showed was the fact that even under the most difficult circumstances, Islam was able to unite different tribal groupings. It also showed the spirit of struggle that Muslims were maintaining, especially those who are reading directly into the book of Allah and following the Sunda traditions of the Prophet Muhammad, peace and blessings be upon him. These revolts that are happening in the early part of the 19th century, the ones that are happening in the 1814, then going up to 1835. They coincide with the great hausa Fulani revolutions that were going on in West Africa. Check was Mandan folio, Rahim Allah, of Sokoto of northern Nigeria. And how Sutherland was a great

00:26:43--> 00:27:32

scholar who succeeded in uniting his people and overthrowing the authorities in house Ireland, and developing an Islamic state of over 250,000 square kilometres. So the spirit of the chef coming out of his literature, and the people who were captured and unfortunate in slavery still showed out, even though they were 1000s of miles away in Brazil. And so today when you see a Brazilian, and you see the spirit that they have, and the young people are watching the Brazilians in soccer, and they see the strong spirit, recognize that a good percentage of Brazil are Muslims. And there are hundreds of people who are coming into Islam today, in Brazil. I leave you with this out this new

00:27:32--> 00:27:41

gem of wisdom that has come forward from the untold stories of history. Assalamu alaykum warahmatullahi wabarakatuh.

00:28:13--> 00:29:02

accepted Islam, also find found themselves on the boat. In early America. It was also reported that some of the African people who were living in America had slaves that they own their own property. But in 1685, the code noir Noir, the black laws were written. And in this, this divisive legislation that was passed, every person of African descent became a slave. And so with no hope, for freedom, resistance became a powerful message amongst the African slaves. And we find that

00:29:03--> 00:29:59

many of the different nations especially the Muslims, were leading the forces against the slave masters and the colonial regimes and reports are coming especially of men, dingoes, which is the English way of saying men Dinka from the mandate people. And we know that this is one of the largest language groups and cultural groups in West Africa. And they became the leaders of the resistance in many parts of the Caribbean and in South America. So we find as some examples, in 1833, a female plantation owner, Gertrude Carmichael, she was living in St. Vincent and Trinidad in the Caribbean. She writes within her writings, and these are available today, that many Negro nations are not

00:29:59--> 00:29:59

idolatry.

00:30:00--> 00:30:57

But they are Maha muttons. So she used this word Muhammad, which is a crusading word, a middle age, terminology used for Muslims, by Ron Edwards, and his famous history of the West Indies. In 1794. He speaks about an old faithful Mandingo servant. And when he describes him, he said he never forgot his morning or evening prayer. And he used to chant in a very shrill voice, La ilaha illAllah. There is no God, but Allah, Robert Madden, a British magistrate who went to Jamaica, during the time when slavery was being abolished, he discovered a society of Muslims living in Jamaica, and Robert Madden had traveled in Turkey, and in some of the Islamic lands, so he learned to speak some Arabic, he

00:30:57--> 00:31:47

knew how to greet Muslims, and to open up a conversation in the Arabic language. So it is reported that he gathered together a group of the slaves who were about to be put into a higher level of life and to be manumitted from slavery. And he recognized something different about them, he could see that they were probably Muslims. So he greeted them in Arabic, and he said, they would have recited the whole of the court and if I did not tell them to be quiet, he also uncovered amongst them a watseka he uncovered a document that was written in the Arabic language, and this was SEPA or this document became a very important piece, because what the document is speaking about, it is calling

00:31:47--> 00:31:59

for jihad. And it becomes the basis of a great slave rebellion that happened in the years 1821 to 1822.

00:32:01--> 00:32:04

Following this, we find that

00:32:06--> 00:32:52

these mandinka people are living throughout the Caribbean region. in Trinidad, the island of Trinidad, which is off the coast of South America, the Mandingo society is developed by the slaves. And this society is developed in order to free slaves to take them out of bondage and to buy them and to then allow them to live a free life. Also, on the island of Cuba, there was a sizable population of Muslims again, Mandingo is a term which is being used for all of the Muslims in Haiti, which is the French colony known to be the first major revolution in the Western Hemisphere.

00:32:53--> 00:33:51

between 1753 and 1757, one of the leaders of the great Haitian uprising was Makka dal and meccan. Del was a Muslim Imam. He was a leader. He was a learned person, and he was part of the great revolution of Tucson, Lovato that happened in Haiti in Suriname, which was the most dangerous colony of the Dutch in that region and Suriname is what they call today also Dutch Guyana. So it falls in South America, the great revolt against the Dutch slave masters was being led by a general called Arabic and his Lieutenant was called Zamzam, like Zamzam water that we drink in Mecca to makalah. So we find Arabic names being used by people to out the region in the Bahamas, who are so famous today

00:33:51--> 00:34:44

for the beautiful beaches, you find on the island of exuma. You find writings that show a large population of people. And the writings show that these were followers of Muhammad. Now we know that this is a middle age crusading term that is being used to describe Muslims. So what they were actually saying is that on the island of exuma, this large portion of the population were Muslims living in the Bahamas. And so documentation like this is coming to the surface, all over the Caribbean region. It is found in South America in Central America, that shows a strong presence of Muslims within this region, and that not only were they part of the societies, but they were the

00:34:44--> 00:34:52

leaders in resistance. Islam gave them a strong identity. And so they resisted culturally.

00:34:53--> 00:34:59

they resisted religiously, and it is reported that part of the system

00:35:00--> 00:35:20

To break the slaves was not to allow them to practice their religions. And especially if the slave masters found somebody who prayed, or who fasted in the month of Ramadan, that person would be tortured to death in front of the other slaves, if they found somebody who would not eat pork, are somebody who would

00:35:22--> 00:36:16

refuse to be naked all the time, they would also torture that person. They broke up the families, they made the people change their language, they change the names of the people from the original African names, or from the names of Islamic origin, especially if the name was an Arabic, they made the people change their name. And by this, they were able to water down the culture and to dissolve Islam into a large slave population. But the the the seeds of resistance remained in the people. And it is through these seeds that we are seeing people on these islands and these regions, accepting Islam in the 21st century, that has returned after a few moments and look about an example of one of

00:36:16--> 00:36:21

the greatest slave revolts in the Western Hemisphere.

00:37:04--> 00:37:22

It is reported by historians that the slavery period in America was one of the most brutal periods in the history of this planet. Millions of people died on the shores of Africa, in the Middle Passage, and in the Americas,

00:37:23--> 00:38:02

in the brutal serfdom, the brutal ball and chain slavery that we find all throughout this region. And because of this brutality, and because of the lack of hope, people naturally resist, and stories of resistance are written in histories in oral cultures. And we find that African slaves resisted right from the shores of Africa, when they knew that they were being taken away from their families, that they resist it, and they would jump off the boats, they would struggle with everything that they had. Also, we find that

00:38:04--> 00:38:58

in the Middle Passage itself, we find that boats were taken over by the slaves and the Amistad. Both of them that the famous well documented, boat has come into popular literature and understanding. And this Amistad is an example of resistance of the slaves. And so this struggle continued right into the Americas. Muslims resisted in Jamaica, in Trinidad, in St. Vincent, in all regions within the Caribbean Basin, in Central America, in the United States. There were different forms of slave revolts. There was in America, not turnout Denmark vz, there were so many different ways to resist. It is reported also a woman Harriet Tubman developed the Underground Railroad, where she enabled

00:38:58--> 00:39:10

Muslims or African people to flee from the south, into Canada. And so this became one of the greatest African resistance in the West.

00:39:11--> 00:39:53

What concerns us here is to bring out an aspect of this resistance that in the past has been overlooked, and that is the presence of Muslims. It is now recognized that over 30% of the slaves brought to the Americas were Muslims. Now, we are seeing documentation coming to the surface. We are seeing that Muslims maintained their culture of writing Arabic, that they maintain the ability to express the code and to express their Islamic culture, even though they were in a state of slavery. One of the most well documented

00:39:55--> 00:39:59

resistances that happened in the West was the case of Brazil.

00:40:01--> 00:40:04

Brazil was a Portuguese Portuguese colony

00:40:05--> 00:40:13

that was developed in the early part of the slavery period. And it was known for its high production in sugarcane.

00:40:14--> 00:40:44

From 1540 to 1570. The Indians, the native people of Brazil, were used in order to deal with the sugarcane. But they couldn't handle the pressure. And this was their original land. So they refuse to submit, and either would die on the plantation, or they would escape. And so Africans were brought from the senegambia region from Benin, coming down from Nigeria, and that part of West Africa and also from Angola.

00:40:45--> 00:41:12

From the southern Gambia region, there came the wall off the mandinka, who had the very strong traditions within Islam, where you had great Mujahideen great strugglers in West Africa. Also from Benin, they will house the slaves. They were Ashanti and they were Yoruba. And a sizable number of the Brazilian slaves also were the state of Islam.

00:41:13--> 00:42:06

They were described by the Portuguese, as exceedingly spirited, and resolute. They will also described as the most intelligent element amongst the important Africans, because many of them could read and write the Arabic language. So amongst the slaves that came to Brazil, and this is a special phenomena that happened in Brazil. And we don't find it like this anywhere else in the Americas. There were a number of Imams and teachers called Malcolm's amongst the slaves. And so they were able to unite the tribes. And they were able to actually concentrate themselves into Islamic communities. The main section of the Muslim population in Brazil, was a province called Bahia. And in the Bahia

00:42:06--> 00:42:06

section,

00:42:08--> 00:42:18

the Muslims were well known for their personalities, and the way that they conducted themselves, it is said that the Muslims would get up early in the morning,

00:42:19--> 00:42:39

they would go to bed early, they live the quiet life. They were very reserved in their conversations. They lowered their gaze, restrain their glances, they did not lie, they did not drink alcohol. They practice polygamy, they had more than one wife.

00:42:40--> 00:43:05

But one interesting aspect about the the Muslims there and it shows the strength of the Imams, they did not allow the men to beat their wives. And so from that a culture develops, a culture of justice develops. And the the the women within the Islamic community of Brazil, were were powerful also, and involved in the struggle.

00:43:06--> 00:43:50

The Imams, and the Muslims, the teachers were able to carry out the different Islamic rituals, they carried on the ceremonies of birth, of marriage of janazah. They developed an independent system of thinking, and from this independent thinking, a type of collective leadership developed. And this leadership had the concept of Amir, where the masses of the Muslims related to the leader, and we're prepared to do anything if it was commanded by the leader, In the name of Allah subhanho wa Taala. And so in May 27 1807,

00:43:51--> 00:44:10

the first revolt took place in Bahia. It was a powerful revolt. And the intention of this revolt was to kill the Masters poisoned the water system, and to return to Africa. But unfortunately,

00:44:11--> 00:44:18

spies weak minded hypocrites would not have been in the ranks of the Muslims

00:44:19--> 00:44:59

gave the information over to the authorities. And the government then waited for the revolt. And just before it was about to take place, they, they suppressed it, and they killed the leaders. But they took some of the people who were involved in it, and they put them on boats and they sent them back to Africa. The second major revolt was in 1814, between 1814 to 1860. This was a spontaneous revolt. It was not organized in the way of the first revolt. And because of this lack of organization and the spontaneous nature of the revolt, they were able to

00:45:00--> 00:45:52

killed many of the masters, and they were able to capture certain sections of the land. But they were eventually put down. And many of their rig leaders were either killed or sent back to Africa. The largest revolt took place in 1835. And this is known as the Great revolt of the Malays. What is important to understand is that this revolt was led by Muslim scholars. And there were 10 Muslim scholars in particular, who gather together and who wrote different documents, they would send the watseka to the other people and you can see a document here, which is actually from Brazilian Muslims, written in the Arabic language. And so the leaders of these revolts came from different

00:45:52--> 00:46:51

parts of West Africa. The well known Chef dandara was a hausser. Muslim, Chef Sonny was a Yoruba Muslim mellem Abubakar ahuna, was also a euro bond, he was the most well known person of the revolt, and also mellem. below. He was also Europa and a well known person within the revolt. What happens now in this concentration, that we find a powerful force coming out of the Muslims, they literally had developed masjids. They were 20 known masjids in Salvador, which is like the capital of Bahia. And they gather together within the masjids. And they established special meeting places like de Juan's, or special places where they would gather together in order to discuss the revolt. And so

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through these secret meetings, and their connection with their Amir, and by communicating in the Arabic language, and taking a special oath from the people, they were able to spread the word of a large revolt far and wide. And it was not detected by the authorities. They chose Ramadan as the date of the revolt, and but unfortunately, again, munafo clean, came into the picture. And they informed the government authorities about this upcoming major revolt of the malaise that was to take place, even so a strong fight continued. And the Muslims were able to take the struggle all throughout the countryside, they were able to conquer certain sections within Salvador. But because

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of the technology, the weapons and the organization of the Portuguese army, the revolt was actually eventually put down. And a mass deportation happened were many of the leaders and many of the people involved in the in the revolt, instead of just being killed. They were put on boats, and they were sent back to West Africa. And it is interesting today, that in Lagos in Nigeria, you can pray in a Brazilian Masjid. So you can make your salaat in a mosque that was built by Brazilian Muslims, who were captured, struggled for the independence and eventually returned to West Africa. And they built masjids within a major West African city.

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What this revolt showed was the fact that even under the most difficult circumstances, Islam was able to unite different tribal groupings. It also showed the spirit of struggle that Muslims were maintaining, especially those who are reading directly into the book of Allah and following the Sunda traditions of the Prophet Muhammad, peace and blessings be upon him. These revolts that are happening in the early part of the 19th century, the ones that are happening in the 1814 and then going up to 1835. They coincide with the great hausa Fulani revolutions that were going on in West Africa. chakras man den folio, Rahim Allah of Sokoto of northern Nigeria, and how Sutherland was a

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great scholar who succeeded in uniting his people and overthrowing the authorities in house Ireland, and developing an Islamic state of over 250,000 square kilometres. So the spirit of the chef coming out of his literature, and the people who were captured and unfortunate in slavery still showed out, even though they were 1000s of miles away in Brazil, and so, today when you see a Brazilian and you see the spirit that they have, and the young people are watching the Brazilians in soccer, and they

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See the strong spirit. Recognize that a good percentage of Brazil are Muslims. And there are hundreds of people who are coming into Islam today in Brazil. I leave you with this up this new gem of wisdom that has come forward from the untold stories of history. Assalamu alaykum warahmatullahi wabarakatuh